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South America Natural Wonders
Sierra Nevada De Santa Marta
El Cocuy National Park
Choco Forest
Los Nevados National Park
Amacayacu National Park
Sierra Nevada De Mérida
Henri Pittier National Park
The Llanos, Venezuela
Orinoco Delta
Guacharo Caves
Amazon Basin
Angel Falls

 

 

 

Sierra Nevada De Merida
Sierra Nevada De Merida
Meridia, Venezuela
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in South America
 
Elevation: 1,790 to 16,422 feet (500 to 5,007 m)
Habitats: tropical forest, cloud forest,
high-altitude grasslands and moors, scree slopes, glaciers
Los Andes venezolanos[1]

 

The Sierra Nevada de Mérida is the highest mountain range in the largest massif in Venezuela, the Cordillera de Mérida, which in turn is part of the northern extent of the Cordillera de los Andes (Andes Mountains). The Sierra Nevada de Mérida includes the highest peaks in Venezuela, Pico Bolívar, which has an elevation of 4,981 metres (16,342 ft), Pico Humboldt, Pico Bonpland and others.

Cordillera de Mérida

The Cordillera de Mérida is a series of mountain ranges, or massif, in northwestern Venezuela. The Cordillera de Mérida is a northeastern extension of the Andes Mountains. The ranges run southwest-northeast between the Venezuelan-Colombian border and the Venezuelan coastal range. The Táchira depression separates the Cordillera de Mérida from the Cordillera Oriental, which forms the Colombia-Venezuela border.

The ranges runs from southwest to northeast and parts lie within each of the following states: Táchira, Mérida, Barinas, Trujillo, Portuguesa and Lara. The southeastern slopes are drained by tributaries of the Orinoco River, while the streams that drain the northwestern slopes empty into Lake Maracaibo. At the northeast tip of the massif lies the town of Barquisimeto and the headwaters of the River Cojedes.

In the centre of the massif is the city of Mérida. Two ranges of peaks lie on either side of the city, the Sierra de la Culata to the north and Sierra Nevada de Mérida to the south. Pico Bolívar, at 4,981 meters elevation (16,342 feet), is the highest peak in Venezuela.

Most of the ranges are covered by Venezuelan Andes montane forests, although the highest elevations (above 3,100 meters) are above tree line. These ranges are home to the Cordillera de Mérida páramo, an enclave of the páramo (tropical alpine grasslands) of the northern Andes. Protected areas in the massif include Sierra Nevada National Park.

Five glaciers are located in this mountain range, also the snowy season is between July-August, and the snow cover the mountains above 4.200 meters, and sometimes above 3.800 meters.[2]

Pico Bolívar

Pico Bolívar is the highest mountain in Venezuela, at 4,981 metres. Located in Mérida State, its top is permanently covered with Névé snow and three small glaciers. It can be reached by means of the Mérida Cable Car, the highest cable car in the world, which departs from the city of Mérida. Pico Bolívar is named after the Venezuelan independence hero Simon Bolívar.The glaciers located in the Pico Bolivar are as the result from Merida glaciation in the Pleistocene.
The Pico Bolívar is located on the mountain previously called La Columna, next to El León (4,743 m) and El Toro (4,695 m). The new name was suggested by Miguel Febres Cordero in 1925. It was officially renamed on December 30th, 1934.[3]

 

Pico Humboldt

Pico Humboldt is Venezuela's second highest peak, at 4,940 metres above sea level. It is located in the Sierra Nevada de Merida, in the Venezuelan Andes of (Mérida State). The peak with its sister peak Pico Bonpland, and the surrounding páramos are protected by the Sierra Nevada National Park. The summit is surrounded by the Eastern Coromoto glacier and the Sievers glacier, the two largest out of the five glaciers remaining in the country (the other three smaller glaciers are on Pico Bolívar). The glaciers on Humboldt Peak (as most tropical glaciers) have been receding fast since the 1970s and they are forecast to melt completely in a couple of decades.[4]

Pico Bonpland

Pico Bonpland is Venezuela's third highest peak, at 4,883 metres above sea level. It is located in the Sierra Nevada de Merida, in the Venezuelan Andes of (Mérida State). The peak with its sister peak Pico Humboldt, and the surrounding páramos are protected by the Sierra Nevada National Park. It share with the Pico Humboldt, the biggest glacier in the country. The name of the peak is in honor to Aime Bonpland, although he never visited the Venezuelan Andes.[6]

The glaciers located in the Bonpland are as the result from Merida glaciation in the Pleistocene.

 

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
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28 finalists-7 winners will be announced in 2011

 

 
References
 
1. Flickr-Los Andes venezolanos-retrieved 6/22/2009-Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
2.Wikipedia-Cordillera de Mérida-retrieved 6/22/2009
3.Wikipedia-Pico Bolivar-retrieved 6/22/2009
4.Wikipedia-Pico Humboldt-retrieved 6/22/2009
5.Flickr-Pico Bolivar-retrieved 6/22/2009-Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
 6.Wikipedia-Pico Bonpland-retrieved 6/22/2009
 Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

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