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South America Natural Wonders
Sierra Nevada De Santa Marta
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Choco Forest
Los Nevados National Park
Amacayacu National Park
Sierra Nevada De Mérida
Henri Pittier National Park
The Llanos, Venezuela
Orinoco Delta
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Orinoco Delta
Warao Indians on Venezuela's Orinoco Delta
Amacuro, Venezuela
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in South America
 
Length of Orinoco River: 1,500 miles (2,560 km)
Area of delta: 10,800 square miles (28,100 sq. km)
Human occupation: 20,000 Waori people
 
 
Warao Indians on Venezuela's Orinoco Delta [1]

 

The Orinoco Delta, also known as the Deltaic System (Sistema Deltaico), is a vast river delta of the Orinoco River, located in eastern Venezuela.
Orinoco River
The Orinoco Delta is fan-shaped, formed by the Orinoco River as it splits into numerous distributaries, called caños, which meander through the delta on their way to the sea. The main distributary is called the Rio Grande, which empties south-southeast through the southern portion of the delta, and the second major distributary is Caño Manamo, which runs northward along the western edge of the delta.
Orinoco River [2[

The delta includes large areas of permanent wetlands as well as seasonally-flooded freshwater swamp forests. The river margins of the delta are fringed with mangroves. Besides, daily tides bring up the "caños" sea water which is responsible for the "macareo" or pororoca and also for inversion of flow direction of water, at least, on its surface.

The Orinoco Delta is characterized by being non-centric, lagoon lacking, and oceanic, somewhat similar to the delta of the Niger River. It is divided in two sections: the principal, at the northernmost part of the system, located between Caño Manamo and the left shore of Caño Araguao, where the majority of villages are established, including the state capital, Tucupita; and the secondary, between the right shore of Caño Araguao and Río Grande.

The Deltaic System is one of the nine geographical regions into which Venezuela is divided. It is located in the whole extension of Delta Amacuro State and a few kilometers of Monagas State, comprehending the totality of the mouths of the Orinoco.[3]

Orinoco River

The Orinoco is one of the longest rivers in South America at 2,140 km, (1,330 miles). Its drainage basin, sometimes called the Orinoquia (especially in Colombia) covers 880,000 km², 76.3% in Venezuela with the rest in Colombia. The Orinoco and its tributaries are the major transportation system for eastern and interior Venezuela and the llanos of Colombia. However, since river navigation is declining in every country, many of the old waterways along the Orinoco watershed are now an obstacle to land communications rather than a useful.

Although the mouth of the Orinoco in the Atlantic Ocean was discovered by Columbus on 1 August 1498 during his third voyage, its source at the Cerro Delgado-Chalbaud, in the Parima range, on the Venezuelan-Brazilian border, at 1,047 m of elevation (02°19'05?N 63°21'42?W? / ?2.31806°N 63.36167°W? / 2.31806; -63.36167 ), was only explored in 1951, 453 years later, by a joint Venezuelan-French team.

The Orinoco delta, and tributaries in the eastern llanos such as the Apure and Meta, were explored in the 16th century by German expeditions under Ambrosius Ehinger and his successors. In 1531 Diego de Ordaz, starting at the principal outlet in the delta, the Boca de Navios, sailed up the river to the Meta, and Antonio de Berrio sailed down the Casanare, to the Meta, and then down the Orinoco and back to Coro.

Alexander von Humboldt explored the basin in 1800, reporting on the pink river dolphins, and publishing extensively on the flora and fauna.[4]

 

Astronaut Photography of Earth
The Orinoco River, the world’s eighth largest river, can be seen flowing to the west and north of the Guyana Highlands in the top portion of the image. The river is located in the Llanos of western Venezuela. Estimated to be 1500 to 1700 miles (2415 to 2735 km) long, the Orinoco River is the second longest river in South America and is navigable for most of its length. The river rises in the southern Guyana Highlands and flows in a wide arc around the highlands through tropical rainforests and savannas. It enters the Atlantic Ocean through a large, expanding delta in northeast Venezuela. The Capanaparo River is visible entering the scene just to the right of the bottom center of the image.  
The Orinoco River
It empties into the Orinoco River near the center of the image. The Capanaparo River is 300 miles (480 km) long and rises in the eastern foothills of the Andes Mountains. The river flows generally eastward across the plain, which has a flat, swampy terrain. Numerous old sand dunes, many with grass cover, can be seen on either side of the river. Near the left center of the image, the Cinaruco River can be seen entering the Orinoco River. Just above the left center of the image, the Arauca River is visible entering the Orinoco. [5]


 

esperantodemorene
May 02, 2008

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
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References
 
1. Flickr-Venezuela's Orinoco Delta-Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 6/27/2009
2. Flickr-Orinoco River-Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 6/27/2009
3. Wikipedia-Orinoco River Deltaretrieved 6/27/2009
4.Wikipedia-Orinoco River- retrieved 6/27/2009
5.NASAThe Orinoco River-retrieved 6/27/2009
 
 Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

 

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