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North America Natural Wonders
Ellesmere Island
Mackenzie Delta
Gros Morne National Park
Gulf of St. Lawrence
Western Brook Pond
Hell's Gate
Burgess Shales
Cathedral Grove
Banff National Park
The Drumheller Badlands
 Brooks Range

 

 

 

Gulf of Saint Lawrence
Bathymetry of the gulf, with the Laurentian Channel visible
Quebec, Canada
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in North America
 
Areas of St. Lawrence-59,846 square miles (155,000 squre km)
Magdalen Islands: 9 main islands--Alright, Amherst, Brion, Coffin, East, Entry, Grindstone, Grosse, Wolf
Gulf of Saint lawrence[1]

 

Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada
On July 24, 2002, northern New England and Canada are lush with summer's greenery. This true-color image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows the Gulf of St. Lawrence north of center. The Bay of Fundy separates mainland New Brunswick from island-like Nova Scotia in the lower left quadrant of the image. The orange color of the water in the inlets is likely the result of extreme tidal changes churning up sediment. The Bay of Fundy has the highest tides in the world. [2]
Credit Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC [2]

 

The Gulf of St. Lawrence is a body of water covering about 60,000 square miles (155,000 square km) at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River. It fringes the shores of half the provinces of Canada and is a gateway to the interior of the entire North American continent. Its name is not entirely accurate, for in a hydrologic context the gulf has to be considered more as a sea bordering the North American continent than as simply a river mouth. Its boundaries may be taken as the maritime estuary at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, in the vicinity of Anticosti Island, on the west; the Strait of Belle Isle between Newfoundland and the mainland, to the north; and Cabot Strait, separating Newfoundland from the Nova Scotian peninsula, on the south.

 

Each spring, starting in late February or early march, female harp seals move out onto the sea, each giving birth to a single, snowy-white pup. The pupping grounds of the "Gulf herd" are near the Magdalen Islands, and here there can be up to 2,00 female seas per square kilometer. Their pups are known as "whitecoats" and they are fed a rich milk containing 45 per cent fat. They put on weight rapidly and are weaned in as little as 12 days, and then abandoned by their mothers. Why the nursing time is so short is not clear, although it is an effective way to get the youngsters ready to swim before the ice breaks up in mid-March. This way they spend the minimum of time on the ice, where they are vulnerable to polar bears looking for food. The seals are also a target of a controversial cull.----

The Gulf of Saint Lawrence (French: golfe du Saint-Laurent), the world's largest estuary, is the outlet of North America's Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a semi–enclosed sea, covering an area of about 236 000 km2 and containing 35000 km3 of water (including the St. Lawrence estuary). It opens to the Atlantic Ocean through the Cabot Strait (104 km wide and 480 m at its deepest) and the Strait of Belle Isle (17 km wide and 60 m at its deepest).

The gulf is bounded on the north by the Labrador Peninsula, to the east by Newfoundland, to the south by the Nova Scotia peninsula and Cape Breton Island, and to the west by the Gaspé and New Brunswick. It contains Anticosti Island, Prince Edward Island, and the Magdalen Islands.

Besides the Saint Lawrence River itself, semi-major tributaries of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence include the Miramichi River, the Natashquan River, the Restigouche River, the Margaree River, and the Humber River. Arms of the Gulf include the Chaleur Bay, Miramichi Bay, St. George's Bay, Bay of Islands, and Northumberland Strait.[1]

You tube video

Along the Cabot Trail Acadian region


davea556
September 30, 2007

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References
 
1. Wikipedia-Gulf of Saint Lawrence-retrieved 7/18/2009
2. NASA.GOV.-Gulf of Saint Lawrence-retrieved 7/18/2009
3.
 
Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

 

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