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North America Natural Wonders
Ellesmere Island
Mackenzie Delta
Gros Morne National Park
Gulf of St. Lawrence
Western Brook Pond
Hell's Gate
Burgess Shales
Cathedral Grove
Banff National Park
The Drumheller Badlands
 Brooks Range

 

 

 

Cathedral Grove
British Columbia, Canada
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in North America
Area of Cathedral Grove: 388 acres
Annual rainfall: 120 inches
Tallest trees: 250 feet
Cathedral Grove

 

 

The forest is composed mostly of mature Douglas fir trees mixed with ancient western red cedar, western hemlock, and balsam fir. The trees are 300 to 400 years old, but some go as far back as 800 years. These older trees stand like giant sentinels in the forest, reaching 250 feet high and trunks measuring over 30 feet in circumference. The rainforest contains trees of various sizes, species and ages, with a large number of dead standing and fallen trees.[2]
   

Cathedral Grove is a rare and endangered remnant of an ancient Douglas fir ecosystem on Vancouver Island in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The biggest trees in the Grove are about 800 years old and measure 75 m (250 ft) in height and 9 m (29 ft) in circumference. They are the survivors of a forest fire that ravaged the area some 350 years ago and the even more devastating invasion by Europeans who colonized Vancouver Island from 1849.[4]

MacMillan Provincial Park is a 157 ha provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. Located 25 km west of Qualicum Beach and 16 km east of Port Alberni, the park straddles Highway 4. It is nestled on the western shore of Cameron Lake, and protects the delta of the Cameron River.

The park is home to a famous stand of ancient Douglas-fir, known as Cathedral Grove, which draws visitors from all over the world. Some of the trees are more than 800 years old and 9 metres in circumference. The flora of the park is typical of the region, and stands of Western Redcedar and Bigleaf Maple can be found south of the highway. The understory (term for the area of the forest that grows in the shade the forest canopy) includes red huckleberry, salal, and Devil's Club. The park is home to several species of birds, including owls and woodpeckers; as well as such mammals as black bear, elk and cougar. The Cameron River and Cameron Lake are stocked with rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout.

Cathedral Grove was popular with visitors long before its protection. It was part of the timber holdings belonging to the forester and logging industrialist H.R. MacMillan, who donated 136 ha of land to the provincial government in 1944. Three years later, the area was established as a Class A provincial park.[3]

You Tube video

Seeing Cathedral Grove on a short loop walk that takes you through a forest of giant trees. The largest are about 800 years old.

 

wen88888
February 13, 2007

 

References
 
1. Flickr-Cathedral Grove Forest- -Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 7/17/2009
2. 1,001 Natural Wonders You Must See Before You Die 2005-p. 22- Michael Bright-retrieved 6/22/2009
3. Wikipedia -Cathedral Grove Forest-retrieved 7/17/2009
 4. Cathedral Grove- cathedralgrove.eu/text/01-Cathedral-Grove-1.htm-retrieved 7/17/2009
 
 
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