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 Brooks Range

 

 

 

Brooks Range
Alaska, U.S.A.
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in North America
 
Highest point Mount Chamberlin
elevation 9,020 ft (2,749 m)
Width 150 mi (241 km), North-south
Length 700 mi (1,127 km), East-west
Brooks Range Slideshow
coordinates 69°16'39N 144°54'40W
Midnight Sun-Brooks Range [1]

 

 

The Brooks Range is a mountain range that stretches from west to east across northern Alaska and into Canada's Yukon Territory, a total distance of about 1100 km (700 mi). The mountains top out at over 2,700 m (9,000 ft). Mount Chamberlin, 9020 ft (2,749 m), is the highest peak in the range. Other notable peaks include Mount Isto, 8,975 ft (2,736 m) and Mount Michelson, 8,855 ft (2,699 m).[1] The range is believed to be approximately 126 million years old.

The range is mostly uninhabited, but the Dalton Highway and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System run through the Atigun Pass (1,415 m, 4,643 ft) on their way to the North Slope and the oil fields at Prudhoe Bay. The Alaska Native villages of Anaktuvuk and Arctic Village, as well as the very small communities of Coldfoot, Wiseman, Bettles, and Chandalar Lake are the only settlements in the 700-mile Brooks Range. In the far west, near the Wulik River in the De Long Mountains is the Red Dog mine, largest zinc mine in the world.

The range was named by the United States Board on Geographic Names in 1925 after Alfred Hulse Brooks, who was the chief USGS geologist for Alaska from 1903 to 1924.

Various historical records also referred to the range as the Arctic Mountains, Hooper Mountains, Meade Mountains and Meade River Mountains; the Canadian portion is still often referred to as the British Mountains. The British Mountains are part of Ivvavik National Park.[2]

Prudhoe Bay, at the northern base of the range, has vast reserves of oil; the National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska covers some 23.5 million acres (9.5 million hectares). The Trans-Alaska Pipeline crosses the range at Atigun Pass en route to the Valdez terminal in southern Alaska. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in the eastern part of the range, is considered by many to be one of the world's ecological treasures; it is home to some 160 species of birds, more than 35 different kinds of land mammals (e.g., caribou, musk oxen, wolverines, and wolves), and several species of marine mammals and fish. This refuge is the subject of controversy between environmentalists and proponents of oil drilling. Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, in the rugged Endicott Mountains, and the adjoining Noatak National Preserve also lie along the range. See also Alaskan mountains. [3]

The scenery in the Brooks Range is jaw dropping. The floors of its labyrinthine canyons are filled with rivers, lakes and meadows. The divides between the canyons run the gambit from sheer stone, walls and smooth, undulating ridges. 95% of the range's area is accessible only via airplane. The Dalton Highway the only road access into the Brooks Range, and only a narrow corridor is within hiking distance of the road. [4]

 

 

AlaskaGeographic — May 02, 2008 — The Brooks Range is one of Alaska's wildest places. Guiding us through these rugged mountains, Richard Nelson, noted anthropologist and writer, reveals the tenuous, yet rich, nature of life above the Arctic Circle. Here, birds come to breed from around the globe and caribou graze in perpetual motion. Home to the once nomadic Nunamiut people now living in the remote village of Anaktuvuk Pass, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is also where Bob Marshall and Mardy Murie were inspired to protect America's wilderness. Their stories weave through the film with that of a Wiseman hunter and trapper. Ultimately, this film is about the people who call wilderness home.

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
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References
 
1. Flickr-Brooks Range, Alaska-retrieved 6/20/2010 
2. Wikipedia-Brooks Range-retrieved 6/20/2010  
3. "Brooks Range." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica 2009 Deluxe Edition. Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica, 2009.- retrieved 6/20/10
4.  VisitUSA.COM- Brooks Mountain Range, Alaska-retrieved 6/20/10
 
 
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