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New 7 Wonders of Nature Nominees

 

 

 

New 7 Natural Wonders of the World

New Seven Wonders of Nature-One of 28 nominees. Winners will be announced in 2011.

 

Bay of Fundy
Canada
Coordinates-45_00_N_65_48_W_
Earth's Natural Wonders in North America
New Seven Wonders of Nature
Folklore in the Mi'kmaq First Nation claims that the tides in the Bay of Fundy are caused by a giant whale splashing in the water. Oceanographers attribute it to tidal resonance resulting from a coincidence of timing: the time it takes a large wave to go from the mouth of the bay to the inner shore and back is practically the same as the time from one high tide to the next. During the 12.4 hour tidal period, 115 billion tonnes of water flow in and out of the bay
Bay of Fundy Slideshow
Bay of Fundy-Hopewell Rocks[1]

 

The Bay of Fundy (French: Baie de Fundy) is a bay on the Atlantic coast of North America, on the northeast end of the Gulf of Maine between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, with a small portion touching the U.S. state of Maine. The Bay of Fundy is known for its high tidal range and the bay is contested as having the highest vertical tidal range in the world with Ungava Bay in northern Quebec and the Severn Estuary in the UK. Some sources believe the name "Fundy" is a corruption of the French word "Fendu", meaning "split" , while others believe it comes from the Portuguese fondo, meaning "funnel."

The bay was also named Baie Française (French Bay) by explorer/cartographer Samuel de Champlain during a 1604 expedition led by Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Monts which resulted in a failed settlement attempt on St. Croix Island.

Portions of the Bay of Fundy, Shepody Bay and Minas Basin, form one of six Canadian sites in the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network, and is classified as a Hemespheric site. It is owned by the provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and the Canadian Wildlife Service, and is managed in conjunction with Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Nature Conservancy of Canada.[2]

Bay of Fundy Tides

 

chuckwag0n
September 12, 2007

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28 finalists-7 winners will be announced in 2011

 

 

References
 
1. Flickr-Hopewell Rocks-Bay of Fundy-Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 6/27/2009
 2. Wikipedia-Bay of Fundy-retrieved 7/25/2009
 
 Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
 
 

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