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Waimea Canyon
Hawaiian Waterfalls
Mauna Kea, Hawaii
Haleakala Crater
Mount Waialeale
Lava Tubes
Mariana Trench
Mount Kilauea
Palau, Micronesia
New Guinea
 

 

 

 

Hawaiian Waterfalls
Hawaiian Islands
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in Australia & Oceania
 
Number of waterfalls: over 24 major falls, over 200 smaller cascades
Longest cascade; Kahiwa Falls, 1,750 feet
Longest sheer drop: Akaka falls, 442 feet
Waterfall [2]
   
Waimoku waterfalls
The Hawaiian islands stand squarely in the path of the wet, northeastery trade winds which shed their moisture-laden burden on the land with unrivaled vigor, Mount Waialeale, on the island of Kauai, is the wettest place on earth. This seasonal deluge, combined with a steep, porous volcan landscape, bestows Hawaii with some of the most dramatic waterfalls to be found anywhere. The flow of water perpetuates itself: as water carves out more of the land, waterfalls plunge even farther. [4]

Waimoku Falls [1]
 

 

 

Manoa Falls is a waterfall on the island of O'ahu in Hawai'i, featuring a vertical drop of about 150 feet (46 m). It is accessible from the nearest road by a hike of approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km). The hike passes through many ecosystems and feels like an arboretum. At the bottom of the falls there is a tiny pool good for wading. The path is often slippery and muddy, and flash floods are prone to occur anytime.

Kahiwa Falls is a tiered waterfall in Hawaii located on the northern shore of the island of Molokai. The waterfall is the tallest in the state, about 2165 feet (660 meters) tall, although often only 1749 feet of its drop are counted as the main fall.

Hiilawe Waterfall (or Hi'ilawe Waterfall) is one of the tallest and most powerful waterfalls in Hawaii located on the Big Island. The waterfall drops about 1,450 feet (442m) with a main drop of 1,201 feet (366m), into Waipio Valley on Lalakea Stream. Lalakea Stream above the falls has been diverted for irrigation purposes so the falls can be dry even during the wet spring in March.

Wailua Falls is a 83-foot waterfall located in Kauai, Hawaii that feeds into the Wailua River. There is a path to the bottom of the falls, but it is muddy, slippery and dangerous. Some hikers have strung ropes along the path, but officials come by every so often and cut them. In ancient times, Hawaiian men would jump from the top of the falls to prove their manhood. There is another waterfall nearby named 'Opaeka'a Falls.

The Falls were featured on the opening credits of the television show Fantasy Island.

'Opaeka'a Falls is a waterfall located on the Wailua River in Wailua River State Park on the eastern side of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. It is a 151–foot waterfall that flows over basalt from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. Below the ridge down into the ravine through which the water falls can be seen the vertical dikes of basalt that cut through the horizontal Koloa lava flows. The name "Opaeka'a" means rolling shrimp, " 'opae" being Hawaiian for "shrimp," and "ka'a" for "rolling". The name dates back to days when the native freshwater shrimp Atyoida bisulcata were plentiful in the stream and were seen rolling and tumbling down the falls and into the churning waters at the fall's base.

Visually, this is a spectacular waterfall and is one of the island's few waterfalls that can be seen from the road. It flows year round and therefore is not seasonal. Most of the time it falls in a double cascade but the two sides may become one after a heavy rain. There is a highway overlook which provides a panoramic view of the 40-foot (12 m) wide falls and the valley below. The best time of day to see the falls is in full sunlight when the water sparkles the most. If the day is cloudy the view is less spectacular.

Makahiku Falls is a 200 foot (61m) horsetail waterfall on the island of Maui in Hawaii. It runs on the Ohe'o Gulch stream[1]. The falls is accessed by the Pipiwai Trail.

 

Rainbow Falls is located in Hilo, Hawaii. It is 80 feet (24 m) tall, and almost 100 feet (30 m) in diameter.

At Rainbow Falls, the Wailuku river rushes into a large pool below. The gorge is blanketed by lush, dense tropical foliage and the turquoise colored pool is bordered by beautiful wild ginger. The fall is accessed by a hike down a slippery path made of stone that ends at the lookout point.

Rainbow falls flows over a natural lava cave, the mythological home to Hina, an ancient Hawaiian goddess. The Rainbow falls derives its name from the fact that, on misty mornings, one can see beautiful rainbow spanning the waterfall.[3]

 

This is 400ft+ Waimoku Falls the highest accessable waterfall on maui. To get here drive to Haleakela National Park past Hana. The trail is above the main parking area. See rangers for any questions.

 

808xtreme808
January 02, 2009

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
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28 finalists-7 winners will be announced in 2011

 

 
References
 
1.Flickr-Hawaiian Waterfalls -Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 6/05/2009
2.Flickr- Hawaiian Waterfalls-Creative Commons Attribution License- retrieved 6/05/2009
3.Wikipedia-Hawaiian Waterfallsretrieved 6/05/2009
4.1,001 Natural Wonders You Must See Before You Die 2005-p. 794- Michael Bright-retrieved 6/2/2009
 
 Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

 

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